Wabash Valley Visions & Voices: A Digital Memory Project
Preserving the past and present for the future
Wabash Valley Visions & Voices: A Digital Memory Project
Home Browse Advanced Search Preferences My Favorites Project Partners Special Collections About Us Help O Miners Awake Civil War Site Index
add to favorites : reference url back to results : previous : next
 
Industrial arts and home economics
Open PDF in new window | Go to PDF description

TitleIndustrial arts and home economics
DescriptionIndiana State bulletin describing the industrial arts and home economics programs available with supporting pictures.
TranscriptionITIDIATIA STATE TIORffiAL SCHOOL BULLETm Vol. xx ffiAlj , 1927 no. 3 ITIDUSTRIAL ARTS ATID HOllE ECOTIOffilCS TERRE HAUTE THIS InSTlTUTlOn lS A Ini:.ln"BER OF THE AffiERlCAn ASSOClATlOn OF TEACHERS COU.EqES AilD THE nORTH CEnTRAL ASSOClATlOn OF COLLEqES AnD SECOnDARlJ SCHOOLS Indiana State normal School Bulletin published quarterlq bq the Indiana State normal School. Tene Haute. Entered as second class matter nouember ~. \907 . at the Post Offke at Terre Haute, Indiana, under the Act of Congreas of Julq l6. l8114 . \ \ \ --- CALENDAR SUMMER QUARTER 1927 First Summer Term Registration, Monday, June 13, 1927. Term ends Saturday, July 16, 1927. Second Summer Term Registration, Monday, July 18, 1927. Term ends Saturday, August 20, 1927. 1927-1928 FALL QUARTER Registration, Monday, October 3, 1927. Class work begins Tuesday, 8:00 a. m., October 4, 1927. (School will be closed on Thanksgiving Day and the Friday immediately following.) Quarter ends Friday, December 23, 1927. WINTER QUARTER Registration, Monday, January 2, 1928. Class work begins Tuesday, 8:00 a. m., January 3, 1928. Quarter ends Friday, March 23, 1928. SPRING QUARTER Registration, Monday, March 26, 1928. Class work begins Tuesday, 8:00 a. m., March 27, 1928. Quarter ends Friday, June 15, 1928. MID SPRING TERM: Registration, Monday, May 7, l!J28. Term ends Friday, June 15, 1928. SUMMER QUARTER First Summer Term Registration, Monday, June 18, 1928. Term ends Saturday, July 21, 1928. Second Summer Term Registration, Monday, July 23, 1928. Term ends Saturday, August 25, 1928. Two ·'n Sst·· I 1. I: .. -- .. )' •• ~-~-~-~.::::: ... _.__~......:..__:.:..:.....:_~-~---~-~~-- ·:====-~---_ ! INDIANA STATE NORMAL.SCHOOL TERRE HAUTE QUARTERLY BULLETIN MAY 1927 VOCATIONAL ASPECTS OF THE GENERAL FIELD OF TEACHING INDUSTRIAL ARTS AND HOME ECONOMICS IN GRADES AND HIGH SCHOOL OPPORTUNITIES OFFERED FOR TEACHERS IN THIS FIELD i ... \ \ THE TEACHING PROFESSION Much might be caid with reference to the vocational aspects of teaching ns a­profession. No- work is more important than that of the teacher. The profession is worthy of the services of our best men and women. The teacher's work is social service of the highest type--it is the work of producing men and women who will be well equipped to take their places in the life which lies beyond the class room. Service to the -pupil, and through him to the community is the aim of all teaching. One who is considerin'g a field of work can readily assure himself that the teaching profession is wo1·thy of the best that he can offer it and that he is considering a field of work which in its opportunities for unselfish, vital, concern to him than the money reward, welcome as it may seem. The teaching profession is a constantly growing one. More boys and girls are in school this year than ever before and more, no doubt, will be in school next year. Enrollments are constantly increasing and with increased enrollments there is an increasing demand for teachers. Recognizing this demand for teachers and assuring them that every well h·ained and devoted teacher will be rewarded for his services the state aLks that the very best of the young men and women enter the profession and offer to it their contributions of ability, of skill, of high ideals and of leadership. Young people looking forward to a life of worthy service should not be misled by the flattering few exceptional salaries of any profession. The most of us are average. and we may ~xpect in terms of financial reward the average offered by the chosen profession. Successful lawyers receive for their services large sums of money, successful business men acquire large fortunes,, and the same might well be said of the few of many professions, but, in comparing the financial rewards of teaching, these rewards must be considered with the averages of other available professions. Many lawyers do -not succeed financially, many physicians are dis-· appointed in the financial return for their practice, and many business men fail. ·The teaching profession considered in terms of finance is conservative; there are fewer financial hazards, consequently less chance of fabulous financial return, but there is an ever-present assurance that service will be adequately rewarded in a financial way. There are other rewards which to many people are more attractive than mere financial rewards. There is a reward which can never be measured in terms of dollars and centl'l in the satisfaction of doing and doing well the work that a person likes to do. The devoted teacher loves. his work, he loves the people with whom he daily comes in contact, he loves to help them solve their problems, he loves to help them meet their difficulties; a respectable Jiving and an opportunity to live a life rich in influential experiences and pleasant associat:ons are of more and uplifting service is Lecond to none. The successful teacher is at all times a dudent; he loves not only the people whose problems he helps to solve hut he loves the great cha-racters, past and present, who have oft'ered such invaluable contributions to their fellow men. His greatest reward is the opportunity to live the kind of life he wishes to live and to be able to attack the varied problems that challenge not only his intelligence but his grace and physical strength. The true teacher is respected among all those he serves; he need not apologize to any man for the choice of life work that he has made; his associates are men and women of intelligence and integrity and high ideals; his followers are the leaders of tomorrow; his task concerns life, it is with life, it is life; what greater reward can any profession offer? Four . ' _._'( -'• .· I DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS I THE TEACHING OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS (NON-VOCATIONAL) AND VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SUBJECTS· What has been said with reference to the teaching profession in general applies equally well to the teaching of all subjects; however, since we are endeavoring·, as one of the speCial featur~s of this bulletin, to present some of the opportunities for teachers in the fields of Industrial Arts and Vocational: Education, we shall now consider certain phases with reference to the Vocational · aspects of teaching in these fields and the opportunities offered at the Normal • School for those who desire to prepare to teach these subjects. There are two general types of industrial wor;k taught in our schools, Industrial Arts (non-vocational) and Vocational Industrial Ec'•ucation (Smith-Hughes work), each requiring teachers of somewhat different qualifications, differing more par­ticularly, however, in the actual tra~e experience required. Industrial Arts (non-Vocatio'nal) is not concerned with the teaching of particular trades; it is a part of our general education scheme. It aims to give boys an introduction to the processes employed in industry and an appreciation of the \vorld of work. As oiie .. of its pm1Joses iCse.rves to mal(e-liim aware-·o:r t1le possibility that his own vocation may. lie in one of the trades. · Vocational Industrial work is intended for the training of workers who· have • already chosen their trades and who wish to prepare to work at some specific trade. For the young man of mechanical tastes and good personality, industrial teaching work offers a splendid field of employment. It is a field of work which is coming into greater and greater prominence, offering advantages .of a steadily growing demand for capable men. It is one of the most enjoyable types of teaching for men and- is·;becoming more -attractive each year as· -schools become better .. equipped ---· to do good .industrial educational work. Vast sums of money are spent each year in the purpose of supplies and equipment for better shops. and the teocher who is interested is usually not disappointed with the facilities that he finds at his disposal for the handling of the subject. This type of work qualifies not only for teaching but also for employment in industry if the student should later find. that his greatest oportunities were in the trades. DEM-AND FOR TEACHERS: . Industrial Arts or Manual Training has been an established subject in the grades and high school for nearly a half cen'tury. 'It is growing from ·year to year and· the demand for well-trained teachers is becoming greater and greater each year as the work expands. . . A recent ·survey made in Indiana by officials of the State Department of Public Instruction with reference to the demands for teachers in different subjects revealed the fact that one of the greatest needs for teachers at the present time in this state is in he field- of Industrial Arts, for special teachers of this subject and those who can teach this line of work along with other subjects. As an indication of the scarcity of teachers in this field, it might be mentioned that the State Licensing Board found it necessary at the opening of schools in September,' 1920, to issue an unusually large number of permits in this subject, as there were not enough well qualified• teachers holding licenses to fill the vacancies. Although the Normal School enrolls on its Industrial Arts courses perhaps as many students as or even more than any teacher-training institution in the Central West, the demands for teachers in this subject are so great that all well qualified men are usually placed each year long before the opening of the schools in the fall. The demand for teachers in this field is far greater than the supply. Five I: I '• I , .. IL Drafting room A portion of $600 worth of concrete products completed in six weeks by training school class; taught by student teacher, supervised by critic teacher. --~- '!' ~ -- ! .' Youi:J.g men who enjoy this kind of work need not hesitate to prepare to teach thls subject. There are many opportunities for employment and with each unit of additional training and with each year of successful experience there is greater opportunity for advancement. The Appointment Committee of the Normal School recommends to school authorities who are seeking to fill vacancies, properly qualified candidates selected from present or former students. This committee seeks to serve, without charge to either, the interests of both the students and the schools who may be in need of such aid. SALARIES: Like academic teachers, teachers of industrial subjects usually work under a fixed salary schedule, which includes a minimum and a maximum salary and an annual increase. The salaries for Industrial Arts teachers vary in different com­munities but the minirinnn is usually around $1200 to $1400 for beginning teachers, while the maximum salaries in the large cities reach up to $2500 a year for elementary schools, and $3000 to $4000 a year for high-school teachers and supervisors. After appointment an increase of from $100 to $200 a year is generally provided for until the maximum::'silary is reached. Comn~unities having vocational industrial work are reimbursed in part by the State fot' the salaries paid by them to teachers of this work. For this and other reasons teachers in vocational industrial work receive larger minimum and maxhpum salaries varying from $300 to $500 each year over and above the salaries paid to teachers of non-vocational industrial work. Once in the profession, one is usually assured of employment for life, with a substantial pension for old age provided for by the state upon retirement. REQUIREMENTS: It is required that all candidates for teaching positions be licensed by the State before being permitted to engage in their profession. However, there are many significant requirements of the successful teacher that are not confined to license laws, nor to contracts nor any other written code. A teacher of Industrial Arts or Vocational Industrial Work should, like all other teachers, have a strong personality and possess qualities of leadership and those virtues of human character inherent in the man who is to make a real teacher. One who expects to go into the schools of the state must have a wholesome respect for the ideals of the best people of the community in which he is to work. The prospective teacher should know that he or she will be expected to live a clean life, that the people of the community will demand hones,ty, integrity and industry, that they will expect the teacher's interests outside of the, classroom to be the interests of the community, that they will expect him to be awake to and interested in the many problems of the community, that they have a right to expect service in their community institutions and organizations, that he assume certain outside responsibilities, that he be a leader and that he stand for something in the community. Until these common requirements are met or at best until the teacher decides that he is willing to do his very best to satisfy, in these demands, the community he serves, there is little need for any prospective teacher's spending time in any study of the technical requirements of the. pro­fession. The above are charncteristics which should be possessed by all te:achers. In addition to these, however, the prospective teacher in this special field of work should possess certain mechanical ability, and an understanding of industrial life and the common industrial processes. Added to these qualifications should be teaching ability and training for the work of teaching. After considering these requirements, the prospective teacher of the subject under discussion should then consider the matter of training necessary to meet the legal requiremetns for licnses. It is a difficult matter to make simple, compre­hensive statements which will answer all inquiries concerning the legal Seven Another view of the above house made ready for plastering at the end of five weeks summer session. -- ~ - - .. -.-... ,. .~,~-~~.-~··~~"~------------------------------------------------- requirements for licenses in this field of work; however,' one may find on the following pages outlines of types of work open to teachers of industrial subjects, the various kinds of licenses issued in these subjects, their legal requirements, and the opportunities offered at the Normal School to meet these requirements. However, before listing for the prospective teacher the various courses ofl'ercd by the Normal School, it seems fitting to describe in fair detail the nnterial equipment of this institution in the field of Industrial Arts, which makes it possible to offer in an effective way the courses listed. INDUSTRIAL ARTS EQUIPMENT T11c de;'ar~mcnts of bdustrid Ar1·.s and Home Economics arc hou~e:l in a three-story building, built especially far ( hese lines of work, yalued at approx:mately $225,000, exclusive of •:qucpmen': valued at $125,000. Th' l'tddine; is a subs~anti:1l fireproof Etructure built of reinforced concrete, brick, and Indiana limestone. It is "T" shaped, 'having a frontage of 120 feet and :: . depth of H2 f 'ct.. The r0ar is of modern factory style, with factory ribbed glass and steel sash, thus providing a maximum of light. The rooms are large and convenient'y a•·:·anged; and thoc .lm !ding is well adapted to its purpose. The building with its splend:d equipment has made it possible to accommodate a large number of students in ma1 y varieties of work. The fire~ and second storic·s, with the exception of two rooms on the first floor, a!·e o~eup'cd by the department of Industt·ial Arts. Rooms h:we been provided and cquirment. installed for a machine shop, forge shop, foundry, work in concr~tc, bench work nnd carp.ontry, wood turning, pattern making, sheet metal, mill work, printing, and electrical work Tne shops nrc all well lighted and arc fully equ'pped with th~ very best modern 0quipment. .A II machines throughout the yarious shops have individual motor drives. The machine shop is equipped with six engine lathes, shaper, milling machine, two drill presses, hack saw, universal grinder, planer, wet grinder, drill grinder, punch precs, and radial drill. Thero:~ is a tool room in connec·:ion with the machine shop in which all necessary small tools are found. In the forge chop there are ten down-draft forges, ten anvils, power hammer. tempering furnaces drill press, grinder, shears, and miscellaneous small tools. The foundry includes, in addition to all necessm·y molding toob, a brass furnace, and cupola for mdting iron. The mill room, which is loc:tted on the se~ond floor, is cqu 'pped with twelve mnchinef, nnmdy, thirty-in;;h c:1binet planer, universal saw bench,· cut-off saw, sixteen-inch jointer, thirty-six-inch band saw, mortiser, tenoner, six-inch four-side molder, shaper, forty-two-inch drum sander, belt sander, and universal woodworker. The turning and pattern-making room is equipped with sixteen motor-head stock lathes and necescary turn;ng tools. In the drawing room are to be found twenty­e: ght drawing tables and one hundred twenty-five sets of drawing instruments. In addition to th s and other miscellaneous equipment a fine electrical blue printing machine h:.1s been added to the drawing equipment. The sheet metal working room is equipped with cornice brake, bar folder, forming machine, grooving machine, circular shean, samson pun::h, double seamin:J; machine, beading, turn'ng,' wiring, burring, and setting down machines, and all necessary stakes and hand tools. The print shop recently installed is equipp~d with twElve type stands, three job presses, one Michie four-roller cylinder press, one Stonemetz cylinder press, one number 14 linotype machine and one number 5 linotype machine, one paper cutter, one stapling machine, saw trimmer, and other miscellaneous equipment. A large room is fitted up for bench work, cabinet making, and carpentry, in· eluding the usual equ.pment for these lines of work. It should be mentioned that most of the work in carpentry is done out on the job in erecting actual buildings. This is also true with reference to much of the concrete work and electrical wiring. Nine r Another sample of practical work in carpentry, all outside and inside carpentry work done by students. Houses like this built by our carpentry classes serve as practical p\-oblems for other classes in house wiring and sheet metal work. A class in cabinet construction - .. - ._. I I r- LINES OF WORK OPEN TO--TEACHERS OF-INDUSTRIAL-SUBJ-E0-TS There are two lines of work open to men who plan to teach industrial sub­jects- Industrial Arts (non-vocational) and Vocational Industrial Work organized under the provisions of the Federal Vocational Act. (Smith-Hughes Law.) Details of the requirements necessary to secure licenses in these two lines of work and the courses offered at the Normal School to meet these requirements are given on the following pages. · INDUSTRIAL ARTS LICENSES There are five kinds of Industrial Arts Licenses· iswcd in Indiana to those desiring to enter this field as beginning teachers, all based on scholastic training. These 'are: (a) Special Elementary School Teacher's License in Industrial Arts, first grade, (b) Special High School Teacher's License in Industrial Arts, second grade, (c) Special High School Teacher's License in Industrial Arts, first grade (d) Regular High School Teacher's License -in Industrial Arts, second grade (e) Regular High School Teacher's License in Industrial Arts, first grade. VOCATIONAL LICENSES There are two grades of vocational licenses iRsued to teachers of reimbursible vocational industrial classes: (a) A second grade license, valid for two years, is issued to those teacherR of shop or related subjects in day, part-time or 'evening schools who have met the minimum requirments outlined fgr such teachers. (See standards as outlined in Bulletin Number SO, Department of Public Instruction.) (b) A first grade license, valid for five years, is issued to those teachers who have met the maximum requirements outlined for such teachers and who have had two or me-re years of vocational teaching experience satisfactory to the Stab Department of Vocational Education. COURSES LEADING TO SPECIFIC LICENSES IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS The courses offered at the Normal School have been planned to meet the re­quirements for all licenses issued for teaching Industrial Arts and Vocational In­dustrial Work as indicated above. There are, therefore, five courses open to the young man who plans to teach Industrial Arts, each of which upon completion meets the scholastic reqtiirements for a specific license: 1. He may complete the Two-year Special Elementary School Teacher's Cou:·se and qualify to teach Industrial Arts in any elementary school and in the ninth grade .: f any high school. This entitles him to a Special Elementary School Teacher's Liceme, firct grade. Details of this course will be found en pages 15-17 of this bulletin. 2. He may complete three years of the Special Four-year High School Teacher's Course in Industrial Arts and qualify to teach Industrial Arts only in- the grades or in any high school. This entitles him to a Special High School Teacher's License in I~dustr.al Arts, second grade. Dela:Is qf this courRe will be found on pages Hl-20 of this bulletin. He may during the progress of this course Lecure also a Regular High_ School Teacher's Lic•)nse, second grade, in some other subjects by meeting the ~·equirements for n major subject, as given on pages 80-87 in General Catalog, 1926-1927. 3. He may complete the Special Four-year High School Teacher's Course in Industrial Arts.;1nd qualify to teach this subject only in the grades or in any high r.chool in the State. ·This entitles him to a Special High School Teacher's License in Industrial. Arts, first grade. Details of _this course will be found on rages 17-19 of this bulletin. He· may during the progress of this course secure also a Regular High School Teacher's License, first grade, in some other subject by meeting the same requirements, as indicated in number 2 above. Eleven -==-;.....:..~- ------ •- !· ·-" 'I f ~- ----~-" ~~ - -0.. .. ~.·.:~· , .. .•,. .l.!!.:....· ·:c:·--·.:.:.··_::::_IL_ ____. ;__~----------------------'--------~---~l i ·'I I I Students preparing for Special High School Teacher's License in Industrial-Arts; · either firtt or second grade as referred to in numbers 2 and 3 above, are not required. to prepare for a license in a second subject, although it is usually advisable to do so. One who chooses to do this may qualify. for a license in a second subject as Mathematic~::, Science, History, Physical Education, etc., during the time he is occupied in meeting the requirments for a Bpecial license in Industrial Arts by using the electives on the special course to meet the requirements for a license in the tecond subject. 4. He may complete three years of work on the Regular High School Teacher's Course (see pages 32 and 80-87, General Catalogue, 1D2G-1D27) including thirty­six specified hours in Industrial Arts, as one of two elective major subjects ·and qudify for a Regular High School Teacher's License in Industrial Arts, second grade. 5. He may complete the Regular High School Teacher's Course referred to in number four above including thirty-six specified ho.urs in Industrial Arts, as one of two elective major subjects, and qualify for a Regular High School Teacher's License in Industrial Arts, first grade. G. He may complete the requirements of the General Supervisor's Course (see pages 103-104, General Catalogue, 1D2G-1D27) including thirty-six specified hours in Industrial Arts, as one of tw:o elective major subjectG, and qualify for a Regular High School Tcache1 's License in Industrial Arts, first grade. The requirements with reference to the thirty-six hours necessary to secure a Regular High School Teacher's License in Industrial Arts, first or second grade, are the same and will be found on page 21 of this buletin. A student enrolled on the Regular High School Teacher's Course and seeking either a first or second grade license must meet the requirm('nts for a license in two major subjects one of which may be Industrial Arts. To meet the requirmcnts for a General Supervisor's Licen~e, two major subjects must also· be chosen, one of which may be Industrial Arts. The General Catalogue of the Normal School, giving complete information with reference to the regular courses referred to in numbers four and five above, may be secured by writing to the Regi~trar of the Indiana State Normal School, Terre Haute, Indiana. The larger schools demand men who are working on the four-year Industrial Arts courses and expect a mari to give full time to this work, but the majority of smaller scho'ols ·do ·not 'offer full time for this work and usually require that a man be able to 'teach some other subject. If a young man has in mind a position in a large school, it is better {or him to do the work of the Industrial Arts Course, as that course leads to the large high-school position and to teaching vocational industrial work Combinations asked vary considerably. Demands come for Industrial Arts with some other subject such as Mathematics, Science, History, and very often Coaching and Physical Education. Many of the smaller high schools ask for Industrial Arts, Science, and Coaching, and very often for combinations the beginning teacher can not be expected to teach, but as a rule, the men who have had good work in the one field find good positions awaiting them. This work offers splendid opportunities for young men and the field is not crowded. The opportunities for advancement are possibly greater in this field than in any other field at this time, as the city systems are calling for specially trained men in the various fields and for supervisors from among the experienced men. COURSES LEADING TO VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL LICENSES There are two courses open to the young man who desires to prepare to teach reimbursable vocational industrial work: 1.. He may complete the Special Four-year Industrial Arts Course as referred to in. Course 3 on page 11 of this bulletin with special emphasis upon shop work;· and may. qualify for a license to teach shop work and related drawing in .any reimbursable vocational industrial school, providing he has had as much as two Thirteen '~. Our modern mill room, equipped with twelve wood-working machines. Glue room and dry kiln located in rooms adjoining. .. -- ·:v· r i I r· I. I I .,---'-··-"-~--.,--.,-----,---,---,-,,.----.-····--:-·- --.-,-.- .. --· _.:_:~:--~.,--· ___, -.- . - ....... years' trade experience. He may also prepare to teach other related subjects while completing this course, as related science and related mathematics, by electing additional courses in those fields. For details of this course see page 21 of this bulletin. 2. One who has had as much as three years of trade experience beyond the apprenticeship stage and is a graduate of high school or its equivalent may qualify for a Second Grade Vocational-Industrial License in the trade for which license is asked by meeting the minimum requirements of 240 clock hours or 20 term hours of approved vocational teacher ·training, as outlined under "Special Courses for Tradesmen Teachers" on page 21 of this bulletin. The requirements for a First Grade Vocational-Industrial license as they relate to tradesmen teachers and college trained teachers are somewhat flexible, depending upon the amount of education above high school and the trade experience taken together. Space will not permit enumerating in this J?ulletin all of the various re­quirements. For further information concerning the 'details of vocational licenses, the prospective teacher of vocational-industrial work is referred to "Vocational License Requirement !' as published by the State Vocational Division of the State · Department of Public Instruction. REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER'S LICENSE IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS TWO-YEAR COURSE Only one grade of Special Elementary School Teacher's License -is authorized­First Grade. A Special Elementary School Teacher's License, First Grade, is valid for five years, renewable thereafter for life on presentation of evidence of three years of successful experience and professional spirit, and is good in any elemen­tary school and in the ninth grade of any high school. Applicants for a Special Elementary School Teacher's License in Industrial Arts must complete the two-year course, 96 hours, plus 8 hours in gymnasium,. and present credits as follows: · Details of Requirements. 1. Professional: (a) Introduction to Teaching (Education 41) _______ 4 hrs. (b) Pr.ychology (Education 21) _________________ _: 4 hrs. (c) Principles of Teaching (Education 43) --------- 4 hrs. (d) Class-room Management (Education 42) _______ 4 hrs. (e) Supervised Observation and Teaching (Education 51 and 52) ------------------ 8 hrs. 2. Ge~eral and Special Academic Courses. (Including related studies) : . A. Professional Academic Courses: (a) Special Methods (Ind. Arts 75) _________ _ B. Shop Work --------------------------------- C. Related Technical Subjects: Mechanical and Architectural Drawing (Ind. Arts 1, 2, 4, and 5 ..: _______ _. __________ _ D. Related Academic: (a) Physics 81 and 83 ----------------------- Fifteen 4 hrs. 32 hrs. 16 hrs. 8 hrs. 24 hrs, 60 hrs. •' ,r· A corner of the sheet metal working r oom A class learning how to wire a house 3. Elective: (a) English 1 or 2 and 20 or 21 _________________ 8 hrs. · ' (b) Other Electives -------------------------- 4 'hrs.- f 4' 12 hrs. Total 96 hrr. 'l. Gymnasium (non-prepared) ............................. 8 hrs. SEQUENCE OF SUBJECTS FOR TWO-YEAR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL First Year First Quarter Second Quarter Second Quarter Education 41 Education 21 Education 43 English 1 or 2 English 20 or 21 Shop Work Industrial Arts 1 Industrial Arts 2 Industrial Arts 4 Shop Work Shop Work Shop Work Second Year Education 11 Education 51 Education 52 Shop Work Industrial Arts 5 Science 83 Industrial Arts 75 Shop Work Shop Work Science 81 Elective Shop Work In addition to the required work specified in the Special Two-Year Indm~trial Arts Course, as outlined above by terms, the student must earn 8 hours of credit in gymnasium 'vork. The student may take the 8 hours' work in gymnasium in 4-hour courses or in 2-hour courses, as a fifth subject during any of the six terms of the. t\vo-year course. Students should consult with the head of the department concerning shop courses to be elected and their sequences. See pages 25 to 30 of this bulletin with reference to shop courses that may be taken during the first two years. REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER'S LICENSE IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS-FIRST GRADE FOUR-YEAR INDUSTRIAL ARTS COURSE The Special High School Teacher's License in Industrial Arts, First Grade, is valid for five years, is renewable thereafter for life on presentation of evidence of three years of successful experience and professional spirit, and is good for teaching or supervising Industrial Arts in any high school, junior or senior, and in any elementary school. · Entrance requirement: Graduation from a commissioned high school or equivalent scholarship. Requirements for graduation: 192 hours. (In addition, 12 hours in non-prepared physical training.) Degree: Bachelor of Science in Education. Details of requirements: 1. Profescional: (a) Introduction to Teaching (Education 41) __________ 4 hrs. (b) Psychology (Education 22 and 23) __ :_ _____________ 8 hrs. (c) Principles of Teaching (Education 45) ____________ 4 hrs. (d) Secondary Education (Education 2) ------------·--4 hrs. (e) Supervised Teaching and Observation (Education 53 and 54)------------------------------------8 hr& Seventeen 28 hrs. I ; .::: J..,- 1 I I 2. General and Special Academic Courses (including related studies) : A. Professional Academic Courses. (a) Theory of Manual Arts and Industrial Education (Industrial Arts 71) -------------- ________ 4 hrs. (b) Organization and Adminiztration of Vocational Education (Industrial Arts 7 4) ------------4 hrs. (c) Special Methods (Industrial Arts 72) __________ 4 hrs. B. Shop Work ..... · ........ ." ..................... 48 hrs. To be elected from the various courses offered in wood­working, machine shop pra~tice, forge work, sheet metal, concrete, printing, etc., but with the view of preparing to teach some specific line of work. 12 hrs. Note-Students may, with the consent of the Head of the Department, substitute four to eight hours of Vocational Educational Courses as listed in Group D below for an equivalent number of hours of shop work. It is advisable that additional courses in Vocational Education be chosen from those listed in Group D as part of the 56 hours in the general elective field. Prospective teachers of vocational shop courses should emphasize shop work. C. Related Technical Subjects: (a.") Applied Drawing (Industrial Arts 1, 2, 4, 5, and 3 or 6) ......................................... 20 hrs. D. Special Courses in Vocational Education: (a) The Teaching of Applied Mechanics (Industrial Arts 61 and 62) .................. 8 hrs. (b) The Teaching of Related Subjects· (Industrial Arts 76) ........................ 4 hrs. (c) Special Problems of Vocational Education (Industrial Arts Gil) ........................ 4 hrs. Industrial Relations (Industrial Arts 63) . . . . . . . . . 4 hrs. Elect 4 hours from Group D See note under B-Shop Work. E.· Related Academic Courses: (a) Mathematics 11 and 22 .................. . (b) Science (Physics 81 and 83) ............... . 3. Electives: 20 hrs. 8 hrfl. 8 ·hrs. (a) English 4 and 21_ ______________________________ 8 hrs. (b) Other Electives -------------------------------58 hrs. 4 hrs. 100 hrs. Total -------------------------------------19 2 hrs. 4. Gymnasium (non-prepared) ----------------------------12 hrs. REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER'S LICENSE IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS-SECOND GRADE THREE-YEAR COURSE The Special High School Teacher's License, Second Gra.de, is valid for two years, is renewable for two-year periods on presentation of evidence of one year of successful experience, professional spirit, and additional school preparation, and is good for teaching or supervising Industrial Arts in any high school, junior or senior, and in any elementary school. Nineteen ... I ' ~ s 0 .0. s 0 .0. .""Q.'') p. ..... 0 I t· I I I I Details of requirements: ,_ ------~·, ~· "-, '' (a) Three years of work on the Four-year Industrial Arts Course with a •' minimum of 144 term hours. ·(b) Of these, 20 hours must be in professional work as outlined in group 1, page 17. (c) 72 hours must be completed in general and academic subjects as outlined in group 2. page 19. (d) The remaining 72 hours necessary to complete three years of work should be chosen from the first three ye;trs of work on the four-year course. REQUIREMENTS FOR REGULAR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER'S LICENSE IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS FIRST AND SECOND GRADE Students enrolled on the Regular High School Teacher's Course or those registered on the General Supervisor's Course, who eiect Industrial Arts as one of two major subjects are required to take 32 hours in the special field plus 4 hours in special methods for both first and second grade, Regular High School Teacher's License. Details of requirements are as follows: Mechanical Drawing (Induslrial Arts 1, 2, and 4) ------------ 12 hrs. Shop Work ---------------------------------------------20 hrs. Special Methods (Industrial Arts 72) ____ ,.. _________________ 4 hrs. Total -------------------------------------------- 36 hrs. REQUIREMENTS FOR VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL TEACHER'S LICENSE FOUR-YEAR VOCATIONAL COURSE The requirements and details of this course, so far as the four-year course in residence is concerned, are similar to the Four-year Industrial Arts Course, as outlined on pages 17-19, except as to the special vocational emphaLis to be placed upon the Shop Work during the junior and senior Y•?ars. (See note page 19) It is required by the State Department of Vocational Education that teachers of Vocational Shop Wnrk supplement the four~year course in residence by two years of successful industrial trade experience. This trade experience may be securled before, during, or after the completion of the four years' work in residence. SPECIAL COURSE FOR TRADESMEN TEACHERS Course in Residence-This course is intended to prepare tradesmen for teaching in reimbursable vocational schools in accordance with the ·requirements of the State Department of Vocational Education. A. Entrance Requirements: · (a) -Graduation from a commissioned high school or equivalent scholarship. (b) Three years of practical experience beyond the apprenticeship stage. B. Courses of Study: Term Hrs. (a) The Teaching of Applied Mechanics , .......... 8 (b) The Teaching of Shop Mathematics .... , ....... 4 (c) Organization and Administration of Vocational Clock Hrs. 96 48 Education .. ·. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 48 (d) Trade Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 48 (e) Industrial Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 96 (f) Special Problems of Vocational Education . . . . . . 4 48 (g) SpeCial Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 48 (h) Supervised Observation and Teaching .......... 8 96 C.· Students who meet the minimum entrance requirements and who satis­factorily complete the 240 clock hours of approved work will be recommended to Twenty-one I': 0 :;:; ·;;; 0 j:l, s 0 Q l,~.~~'-------------------------- I 1 I ! the State Department of Vocational Education for a license ·to teach the trade for which preparation has been made. EXTENSION COURSES 2. A. The above courses will be offered in extension centers whenever requested by the State Vocational Department. B. All studnts meeting the entrance requirements may apply credits for work done in the above courses, eithei· in residence or in extension centers, towards graduation from the Four-year Industrial Arts Course leading to a B. S. degree. SEQUENCE OF COURSES FOR THE FOUR-YEAR INDUSTRIAL ARTS COURSE First Year First Quarter Education 41 English 4 Industrial Arts 1 Shop Vlork Second Year Mathematics 11 Science 81 Shop Work Elective Second Quarter Shop Work English 21 Industrial Arts 2 Elective Education 22 Mathematics 22 Industrial Arts 5 Shop Work Third Quarter Shop Work Shop Work Industrial Arts 4 El.o !:;ve Education 23 Science 83 Industrial Arts 3 or 6 Shop Work ---------------------------------------------- Third Year Education 45 Shop work Industrial Arts 72 Elective Fourth Year Education 54 Shop Work Elective Elective Education 2 Shop work Industrial Arts 71 Elective Shop Work Vocational Education Elective Elective Education 53 Shop work Industrial Arts 74 Elective Vocational E:iucation Vocational Education Elective Elective In addition to the required work specified in the Special Four-year Industrial Arts Course, as -outlined above, the students must earn twelve hours' credit in gymnasi]lm work. The student may take the twelve hours' work in gymnasium in four-hour courses or in two-hour courses as a fifth subject during any term. Students should consult with the head of the department concerning shop courses to be elecb~d and their sequence. See payes 25-30 of this bulletin with reference to shop courses, which may be taken during the first two years and the last two years on a four-year course. Twenty-three _' ._ I ~-----------: ____ _ DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS Merit Lees Laubach, Professor Drawing and Special Methods Arthur H. Luehring, Assistant Professor Metal Work Reuben H. Snitz, Assistant Professor Wood Work John C. Tranbarger, Assistant Professor· Printing George K. \Veils, Assistant Professo1' Vocational Education Burton A. Knight, Instructor, Summer Term Carpentry and Architectural Drinving Sylvan A. Yager, Instructor, Sunimer Term General Shop, Fui·niture ·weaving and Concrete SUBJECTS OFFERED DURING SPRING AND SUMMER TERM 1927 AND THE SCHOOL YEAR Hl27-28 The various courses in the Department of- Industrial Arts will be offered as indicated below during the Fall, \V'inter, Spring, and First Summer Terms. SpeCial announcement will be mad1e later with reference to the courses that may be offered during the second summer session, 1927. GENERAL ACADEMIC SUBJECTS DRAWING First and Second Year Work 1. Elementary Mechanical Drawing-This is a beginning course, and deals with the elementary principles of mechanical drawing. Fall, "Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. 2. Machine Drawing-This is a continuation of Course 1 and deals with machine drawing, making of freehand sketches of machine parts; detailed drawings of machine parts; assembled drawing~· tracing and blue prints. Fall, Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All Courses. Prerequisite, Course 1. 4. Architectural Drawing-An introductory course in which is included prelimin­ary and finished sketches of parts of simple frame houses and drawing of the necessary floor plans, elevations, and details of construction. Fall, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, '1 hours. All Courses. Prerequisite, Course 1. 5. Architectural Drawing-A continuation of Course 4. Winter, Spring, and Fir~t Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 4. Third and Fourth Year Work 3. Advanced Drawing-This course includes the laying out and designing of cams, the cycloid and involute curves and their application to spur gears, racl's and pinions·; worm gear; internal gears; cam and crank motions. Spring and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. Four-year courses. Prerequisite, Course 2. 6. Architectural Drawing-A continuation of Course 5. Spring and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. Four-year course._ Prerequisite, Course 5. WOOD WORK First and Second Year Work 21. Elementary Bench ·work-This ·course includes the mastery of simple wood­worldng tools and principles of joinery as applied in elementary wood work. Fall, Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All Courses. 23. Furniture and Cabinet Construction-This course embraces advanced joinery as applied to cons-truction of furniture and cabinet work. F.all, Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 21. 24. \Vood Turning and Pattern Making-This course deals with the various methods used in turning hard and soft woods and beginning pattern making. Full Twenty-five \Vintcr, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 21. 50. General Shop-This course is planned to meet the various needs of those preparing to teach in a general shop in which a variety of activities arc centered around wood work as the basic activity, and includes such other activities as sheet metal, plumbing, electricity, etc. It includes a study of the theory and organization of the general shop and household mechanics courses with special emphasis upon working out and using the job sheet, also pratical work in the construction o! projects. First Summer Quarter. Credit, ,1 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, at least six terms of shop work. 56. Furniture ·weaving-This course is devoted to a study of the different types and combinations of weaves in the construction of fibre coni furniture. Special emphasis is laid on the construction of forms, design of projects, and the planning of this kind of work for junior and senior high-school classes. Spring Quarter. Credit, '1 hom·s. All courses. Third and Fourth Year Work 22. Carpentry-This course covers the fundamental principles included in con­struction of wood frame buildings and when possible the construction of a complete building. First Summer Quarter. Credit, ,1 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 21. 25. Pattern Making-This course is a continuation of Course 24, covering the fundamental principles involved in pattern making. Fall, Winter, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. Four-year courses. Prerequisite, Course 24. 27. l\Iill \Vork-This course aims to give instruction in the usc, care, and operation of wood-working machinery. The following machines arc used: planer, pointer, swing saw, universal saw, molder, mortiscr, band saw, drum sander, slwper, and universal wood worker. Fall, \\'inter, and First Summer Quarters, Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisites, Courses 21, 2:1, 2'1, and 25. 28. Mill \Vork-A continuation of Course 27. Fall, \\'inter, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 27. METAL WORK First and Second Y car \Vork :n. Machine-Shop Practice-This course is a bcginn:ng course in machine­shop practice and deals with bench work and beginning lathe work. Fall, Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. 32. Machine-Shop Practice-This course deals with work on milling machine, simper, and planer, and advanced work on the lathe. Fall, \Vintcl·, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 31. 33. Machine-Shop Practice-Tllis course includes making spur, bevel, spiral, and worm gears and rack. Simple tool making, hardening and tempering in oil, case hardening; usc of the sclcroscopc and pyrometer. Fall, \Vintcr, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. Four-year com·scs. Prerequisite, Course 32. 38. Forging-This is a beginning course and deals with the elementary prin­ciples of forge work. Fall and Spring Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. Four-year courses. 40. Founclr~' Prnctisc-This is a beginning cour~c in foundry practise and includes bench molding, core making, cupola practice, brass and aluminum molding. Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. 51. General Shop-This course is planned to meet the needs of those preparing­to teach in a general shop in which a vnricty of activities are centered around mctrtl work ns a basic activit~· and im·ludes such al'livitics as machine-shop practice, forging, foundry, etc. It includes a study of the theory nnd organization of the general shop with spcci::JI cmphnsis upon working out nnd using the job sheet, also practical work in the construction of projects. Winter Quarter. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, nt least ~ix terms of shop work. Consult Head of Department. 52. Sheet l\!ctal \\' ork-This is an elementary com·se which invoh·cs simple Twenty-seven High school boys, from the Normal Training School learning foundry practice, under direction of student teacher I.,' li It ,. ! .• . . ·problems in sheet metal work. This course includes the common sheet metal working machines and the various operations involved. Spring Quarter. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, lndustial Arts 2. Third and Fourth Year Work. 34. Machine S.hop Practice.--Th!s course is a continuation of Course 33 and includes more advanced work in tool making, and the making of dies, with special practice in the care,. use, and operation of universal grinding machine. Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarter. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 33. 39. Forging-This is a continuation of Course 38 and includes more difficult welding, acetylene welding, and heat treatment of high-speed steel. Spring Quarter. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 38. 41. Foundry Practice.--Thi11 is a continuation of Course 40 and includes the making of floor molds, open molds, sweep molds, m.atch plates, cupola operation, and brass and aluminum molding. Spring and First Sunimer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 40. PRINTING First and Second Year Work 81. Printing.-This is a beginner's course. It includes learning the case and the setting of simple articles and rule designs. Shop rules and shop practices are explained. Fall, Winter, Spring, and First Su.mmer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. 82. Printing-Practical experience in working platen presses, including make­up, lock-up, and make-ready, is given in this course. The point system is introduced. Elementary job and ad composition are offered. Fall, Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 81. 83. Printing.-The more difficult compositions including rule and leader forms are done. Multiple justification and the setting of poetry and programs are offered. Fall, Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 82. 84. Printing.-Job and ad lay-outs, working of cylinder presses and news­paper make-up are important part·s of this term's work. The history of printing and biographies of great printers are offered. Stress is placed on shop administration and the teaching of printing. Fall, Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 83. 85. Printing.-The Linotype. Actual practice on newspaper composition with considerable attention to care and up-keep of the machine. Fall, Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit 4 hours. All courses. Prequisite, Course 84. Third and Fourth Year Work 86. Printing-A continuation of Printing 85 with the opportunity to acquire speed, and gain a more thorough knowledge of mechanical details. Fall. Winter, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. Prerequisite, Course 85. CEMENT WORK First and Second Year Work 58. Cement Work-A study of fundamental principles involved in concrete construction as related to building, farm, and home. Materials and mixtures; care and use of tools and equipment; practical work in constructing forms and molds; projects involving pouring and finishing; plain concrete construction, such as fence posts, farm utilities, sidewalks, curbs, building blocks, walls, steps troughs, etc. Lectures on various use of cement, compoitions, sources of material, history. First Summer Session. Credit, 4 hours. All courses. c (Note-In addition to the courses outlined above, practical courses covering from four to six terms of work in each of the various lines of shop work offered· in Industrial Arts have been planned to meet the needs of those preparing to become shop teachers in vocational schools, and will be offered as occasion may require. Twenty-nine \ \ \ ~~--~~----~~------------------~----------------------~------..... ; SPECIAL SUBJECTS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION First and Second Year Work 7 5. Special Methods-Teaching of Industrial Arts courses in upper grades and ninth year. For two-year students only. In addition to the special methods of the subject, particular attention will be given to the organization of courses and the study of equipment. Open to two-year people only. Fall Quarter. Credit, 4 hours. Two-year courses. Third -and Fourth Year Work 61 The Teaching of Applied- Mechanics !__::_This course is intended primarily to assist teachers in planning and organizing related mechanical work in vocational schools and classes. The course will deal with the teaching of electricity. Attention will also be given to the uses of electricity in industry. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Fall and Winter Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. Four-year courses. 62. The Teaching of Applied Mechanics 11-This course has the same objective as Courst 61 except that it will deal with the organization of courses in automobile theory in co-operat.on with the shop work in this subject. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Winter and Spring Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. Four-year courses. 63. Industrial Relations !-This course consists of a review of the history and development of our pre3ent indus~rial system, followed by a study of some of the principal problems in industrial management and wage systems. The class work will be supplemented by frequent field tr:ps to indu:;,trial plants. One trip to visit Indi­anapolis industr:es will probably be made. S~udents should keep the hour free after this class in order to have sufficient time for plant visit . Open to Jun:ors and Seniors only. Fall and Spring Quarters. Cr€dit, 4 hours. Four-year counes. 67. Trade Analysis-In this course a study will be made of the methods of analyzing trades for teaching and guidance purposes. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Spring Quarter. i 68. Special Problems in Vocational Education-Fundamental problems of vocational education will form the content of this course. Partictllar emphasis will be placed upon the problems of guidance, counciling and placement, as well as upon the selection of students for vocational classes. Open to Juniors and Seniors. only. Winter Quarter. Credit, 4 hours. Four-year courses. 71. History and Theory of Industrial Education-This course includes the history, theory, and development of manual training and vocational education. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Winter Quarter. Credit, 4 hours. Four-year courses. 72. Special Methods-Teaching of industrial courses in high school. For four­year students only. This course deals with the special methods included in shop instruction, selecting the right kind of work, possibility of adapting the work to ·t:he ability of the pupil, productive work, and the exerc:se. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Fall, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. Four­year courses. 74. Organization and Administration of Vocational Education-During the first part of the term a study of the needs for vocational education will be made. This will be followed by a brief survey of the vocational-education movement, up to and including the passage of the Smith-Hughes Law. The last half of the course will be devoted to the study of the provisions of the state and federal acts for vocational education. Typical school organizations will be studied and observations made in at least one claLs of each knd studied. Open to Juniors and s~niors only. Fall, Spring, and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours.· Four-year courses. 76. The Teaching of Related Subjects-This is a course for teachers of related mathematics and science in day, part-time, and evening classes. The subject matter will consist essentially in the organization of courses, a study of the problems in­volved, and the methods of presenting the subjert to students. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Spring and First Summer Quarters. Credit, 4 hours. Four-year courses. Thirty ' I. 1: •' ,· ! ;r I. j L ]'. r I, :: ''" ·-=~~-~-.-=.:..·c.-..::..-:::_~-·r_.",..,-"":;;:::c~·~•----'-:...:...l~::_ .::...~--'"-'--·-·-·.::: • .:..;~..L...:....::....;.._• _-:::..:....__. ·-~~--- ____ :_~ .• I DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS I THE TEACHING OF HOME ECONOMICS Wherever Industrial Arts is taught to the boys, there the girls are taught the problems of Home Making. Wherever Agriculture is taught, there too the girls are taught Home Making. So whether you choose to teach in the country, town, or city, there is everywhere the demand for teachers of Home Economics. Up to date the supply of well qualified teachers of Home Economics has not met the demand; so no talented young woman need to hesitate to enter this field. There is no broader education to be had for any girl. She can never escape the many problems of clothing, food, shelter, finance, budgets, house decoration, etc. These are ever with her, whether she teaches all of her life, or whether she serves the three years, which, statistics show, is the average term of public service rendered by a working woman. Time spent in preparing to teach in this field is never lost. The student may earn her fair share of salary as a teacher of Home Economics; then if she. tires of the teaching .. profession in later life, she has an education which she may use in numerous ways. The commercial field is taking many teachers who have prepared for professional service, and the sahries paid to these people are very flattering as compared with wages paid to teachers in Indiana. There is no limit to the number of positions open to professionally trained Home Economics teachers. Most girls are taught from childhood that they will marry and hav!) homes of their own some day; so why not prepare for that job as well as for the professional one. The two preparations may be made at one time in the. field of Home Economics. A girl educated in this way should be a bigger person., a better manager, a more competent child trainer, and a more valuable citizen of the land. SALARIES: Minimum salaries for teachers of Home Economics are fixed under salary schedules, as are all other teachers' salaries in the State of Indiana. The maximum is regulated according to local conditions and by local authority. However, the average salary compares favorably with the salaries of other teachers. Where part of the salary is paid by the Federal Government, that is, where the Smith-Hughes Vocational Schools are maintained, there is a tendency to increase the salary and lengthen the school year. Besides this, there is always an opportunity to earn more money by teaching in some of the numerous part-time or evening classes. Pensions are provided for teachers of Home Economics, as they are provided for other teachers in the State of Indiana. REQUIREMENTS: The first requirement of a successful teacher of Home Economics is that she be a true woman, in the biggest sense of that word. She must believe iiJ her own work, and should make the community in which she labors know that she is interested in her field, and in its problems. All candidates for teaching positions in the State of Indiana must be licensed, such licenses being granted upon professional training. The following pages outline courses and curricula offered at the Indiana State Normal School leading to licenses. HOME ECONOMICS EQUIPMENT The third story of the Normal Vocational Building and two rooms of the first story are occupied by the Department of Home Economics. All rooms are well lighted, completely furnished, and fully equipped with the best modern devices for teaching the various courses in this field of work. Cooking laboratories are equipped with different types of stoves-gas, coal, electric, and oil-each with a meter attached so that the economic phase of food Thirty-one ' I :.n_- 2 preparation ~may be studied :"along with the practical~ probleri1s. A modern kitchen and dining-room afford opportunity to project the work into actual home conditions, different from laboratory practices. Looms of various types-two and four harness table looms, rug looms, spinning wheels, flax wheels, etc., offer students in Textiles an opportunity to study the equip­ment used for commercial production. Materials of various weaves, as well as the raw fibers, present a basis for fabric identification and judgement. A hospital bed and complete hospital chest give the students in Home Care of the Sick an opportunity to employ this equipment in a practical study of the subject. Much illustrative material is used in teaching House Decoration, including a section of a house with two windows. This is used in a study of window draperies in relation to interior decoration and also in relation to the outside coloring of a house. Clothing laboratories are fully equipped with machines of different types­electric and foot power-storage closets, tables, ;mirrors, etc. The laundry on the first floor is fitted with stationary tubs, ironing boards, dryer and washing machines of several types. This laboratory affords opportunities for practical demonstration in classroom practices, as well as sufficient equipment for the study of laundry problems in the home. In connection with these laboratories, the department has management of the school cafeteria where the mass of our student bc; dy takes meals. The dining room of the Women's Dormitory is under the management of this department. These afford ample opportunity for practical experience in Institutional Classes. The Practice House of fifteen rooms is managed by the department for the purpose of affording practical experience in the problem's of Home Making. It is fully equipped for such purposes. The department has established a close relationship with the vocational schools of the city. In these schools, the students observe the work of all types­evening schools,- ali-day, and part-time classes. Practice Teaching in Home E~onomics is carried on in our own Training School, in the City Schools, and in the Girls' Vocational School. The plant at the Indiana State Normal School is, on the whole, completely equipped to carry on the work in Home Economics Education. HOMEECONOMICS LICENSES Home Economics Licenses are granted to beginning teachers, all based upon scholastic training, as follows: (a) Special Elementary School Teacher's License in Home· ,Economics, first grade. (b) Special High School Teacher's License in Home Economics, second grade. (c) Special High School Teacher's License in Home Economics, first grade. (d) Regular High School Teacher's License in Home Economics, second grade. (e) Regular High School Teacher's License in Home Economics, first grade. COURSES LEADING TO SPECIFIC LICENSES IN HOME ECONOMICS There are five courses open to the young woman who plans to teach Home Economics, each of which,· upon completion, meets the scholastic requirements for a specific license. ~ 1. She may complete the Two-year Elementary School Teacher's ·Course and qualify to teach Home Economics in the grades and in junior high. school. This entitles· her to a Special Elementary ~School Teacher's License in Home Ecoiwmics. Details of this course may· be found on page 37 o:f this bulletin. Thirty-thre~e- ~ · ....... . -. ,. - a~ ,• 2. She may complete three years of the Special Four-year High School Teacher's Course in Home Economics and qualify to teach Home Economics in either the grades or in high school. This entitles her to a second grade Special High School Teacher's License in Home Economics. Details of this course may be found on page 39 of this bulletin. A second grade license in some other high school subject may be worked out with the second grade license in Home Economics. See the general catalogue for statement concerning requirements for second grade licenses in high school subjects. 3. She may complete the Four-year Special High School Teacher's Course in Home Economics and qualify to teach Home Economics only, or Home Economics with another subject in grades and high school. This entitles her to a first-grade Special .High School Teacher's License in Home Economics; it also qualifies her to teach in any vocational school (Smith-Hughes) in the United States. A first grade license in some other high school subject may be worked out along with the first-grade license in Home Economics. See the general catalogue for statement concerning requirements for first grade licenses in high school subjects. Students preparing for Special High School Teacher's License~ in Home Economics, either first or second grade, are not required to prepare for a ;icense in a second subject, but it is usually advisable to do so. There are electives in the curriculum leading to the special licenses which may be used in working out a second major in almost any high-school subject. 4. She may complete three years of work 'on the Regular High School Teacher's Course, including thirty-six specified hours in Home Economics, as one of two elective major subjects and qualifiy for a Regular High School Teacher's License in Home Economics. This entitles her to a second grade license. Completion of three years on the Special Four-year High School Teacher's Course entitles the person to a second grade license in Home Economics. 5. She may co~plete the requirements of the Regular High School Teacher's Course, including the thirty-six specified term-hours in Home Economics, and qualify to teach H'ome Economics in high school. This entitles her to a first grade license. A second high-school subject may be carried on this course in which the student makes a license. 6. She may complete the requirements of the General Supervisor's Course, in­cluding the thirty-six specified hours in Home Economics, and qualify to teach Home Economics in high school or in the grades. This entitles her to a second-grade license. The specified thirty-six hours necessary to secure a Regular High School Teacher's License in Home Economics are listed in the general catalogue under Introduction to the Departmental Statement and are ah:o listed in this bulletin, page 43. Many schools now offer full time work for Home Economics teachers; so there is little probability of the well trained young teacher's failing to secure a desirable position. Four-year courses offer advantages because larger fields of possibilities are open, and the graduate is more mature, and better trained; the elective fields are larger and the training is broader. The two-year course has the advantage of preparing girls to accep,t positions at the earliest possible date, but it limits their possibilities because it holds them strictly to grades and junior high school. The course is rigid and provides for no electives. Many small high schools need teachers of Home Economics who can teach another high-school subject. This preparation may be made on either the Four-year Special Course in Home Economics or on the Regular High School Course. Many calls for teachers of Home Economics demand the teaching of either English, Latin, or Science also. During the- past many requests have been made for teachers of Home Economics, Music, and Art, but no beginning teacher can · expect to qualify for such a wide range of subjects. Since the Home Economics Course is primarily a science course, it is not difficult for beginning teachers to Thirty-five ~·. / ·, 'I /I r : ,' . ~ .. ·, qualify for Home Economics and Science. This makes a very logical combination .. There are also many demands for Home Economics and English, and, as a certain amount of English is required of every college student, this combination can easily be made. Any subject that is on a curriculum may be taken for a second license if the student is careful to select the specified courses in the partcular subject that will entitle her to that license. REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER'S LICENSE IN HOME ECONOMICS TWO-YEAR COURSE .. Only one grade of Specbl Elementary Scho"ol Teacher's License is authorized­First Grade. It is valid for five years, renewable thereafter for life on presentation of evidence of thrEe years of successful experience and professional spirit, and good in any elementary school and in the ninth grade of any high school. Applicants for a Special Elementary School Teacher's License in Home Eco­nomics must complete the two-year course, 96 hours, and present credits as follows: 1. Professional: Introduction to Teaching (Education 41) ________________ 4 hrs. Psychology (Education 21) -------------------------- 4 hrs. Principles of Teaching (Education 43) ------------------ 4 hrs. Class-room Management (Education 11) ---------------- 4 hrs. Practice Teaching (Education 51 and 52) -------------- 8 hrs. Total 2. General and Special Academic (including related subjects) : Physiology (Science 91) -----------------------------· 4 hrs. General Chemistry (Science 41 and 42) ---------------- 8 hrs. Organic Chemistry (Science 43) ------·----------- ______ 4 hrs. Dietetics (Home Economics 8) --------------------·---- 4 hrs. Design (Art 22 or 26) ------------------------------ 4 hrs. Foods and Cookery (Home Economics 5 and 6 or 6 and 7) __ 8 hrs. Clothing (Home Economics 1 and 2 or 2 and 3) ---·------- 8 hrs. Home Management (Home Economics 11) --------------- 4 hrs. Home Care of the Sick (Home Economics 14) ---------- 4 hrs. Textiles (Home Economics 4) ---· _____________ :__··---- 4 hrs. Organization of Home Economics (Home Economics 18) __ 4 hrs. 24 hrs Total ----------------------------·-------------------- 60 hrs. 3. Electives: English 1 or 2 and 20 or 21 -------------------------- 8 hrs. Other Electives -----------------------·------------- 4 hrs. Total ______________________________ .:_ _________________ 12 hrs. Total ______________________ :_ ____________________ 96 hrs. 4. Gymnasium (non-prepared) ----------------------------------- 8 hrs. Thirty-seven . --.., ·'· //' j ,,-·.·1_ ··:. ~ Home Care of the Sick. Practical care of patient in bed SEQUENCE OF SUBJECTS FOR TWO-YEAR COURSE IN HOME ECONOMICS (ELEMENTARY SCHOOL) First Year First Quarter English 1 or 2 Second Quarter Third Quarter ---------------------------------- H. E. 4 (Textiles) Education 41 Science 91 Second Year English 21 H. E. 14 Art 22 or 26 H. E. 2 or 3 .H. E. 1 or 2 Education 43 Education 21 Science 41 ----------------------------------------------------- Science 42 H. E. 5 or 6 H. E. 17 Education 11 Science 43 H. E. 18 H. E. 6 or 7 Education 51 H. E. 8 H. E. 11 or 15 Elective Education 52 Students who have had 130 hours of Clothing in a recognized high school may omit Clothing 1 (H. E. 1) and may register for Clothing 2 (H. E. 2). Students who have had 130 hours in Foods and Cookery in a recognized high school may omit Foods and Cookery 1 (H. E. 5, and may register for Foods and Cookery 2 (H. E. 6). In addition to the required work specified in the above curriculum the student must earn 8 hours credit in gymnasium work (non prepared). It is advimbl(; to carry a two-hour course in gymnasium as a fifth subject throughout the course. REQUIRMENT FOR SPECIAL HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER'S LICENSE--FIRST GRADE IN HOME ECONOMICS FOUR-YEAR COURSE Degree: Bachelor of Science in Education. Approved for First Grade Special High School Teacher's License and good for teaching and supervising Home Economics subjects in any h"gh school (junior or senior) and in any elementary- school. Approved for Second Grade Special High School 'I'eacher's License upon completion of first three years' work of this course and good for· teaching and 1 supervising Home Economics subjects in any high school (junior or senior) and any elementary school. Approved for license for teaching in vocational sch'lols established under the provision of the· Smith-Hughes Law subject to the requirements of the State Vocational Department, such as teaching experience, etc. The elective field has been enlarged, maldng it possible for students specializin~ in Home Economics to prepare for a license in a second subject. A first grade license in high school subjects may be made in the elective field of 56 hours. Details of Course: 1. Professional: Introduction to Teaching (Education 41) --------------- 4 hrs. Psychology (Education 22 and 23) ---------------------- 8 hrs. Principles of Teaching (Education 45) ----------------- 4 hrs. Secondary Education (Education 2) ____ ::_ _______________ 4 hrs. Practice Teaching (Education 53 and 54) -------------- 8 hrs. Total Thirty-nine 1a~· 28 hrs. Foods. Operation of modern labor saving devises such as are suitable for home use 2. General and Speciai Academic (Including relat~d subjects) : Economics and Sociology (Economics 31, 32,33 or 41) ___ 12 hrs. Physiology (Science 91 and 93) ----------------------- 8 hrs. Design (Art 22 or 26) ------------------------------- 4 hrs. Bacteriology (Science 95) ---------------------------- 4 hrs. Chemistry (Science 41, 42, 43 and 44) ---------------- 16 hrs. Home Management (Home Economics 11 and 12) -------- 8 hrs. Textiles (Home Economics 4) ------------------------- 4 hrs. Foods and Cookery (Home Economics 6 and 7) __________ 8 hrs. Clothing (Home Economics 2 and 3) ------------------ 8 hrs.' Costume Design (Home Economics 13) ----------------- 4 hrs. Dietetics (Home Economics 8) ------------------------ 4 hrs. Home Care of the Sick (Home Economics 14) ---------- 4 hrs. Millinery (Home Economics 16) ----------------------- 4 hrs. House Planning and Decoration (Home Ecohomics 15) ____ 4 hrs. Home Economics Methods (Home Economics 17) ________ 4 hrs. Organization of Home Economics (Home Economics 18) __ 4 hrs. Total ----------------------------------------------- 100 hrs. 3. Electives: English (English 4 and 21) --------------------------- 8 hrs. Other Electives ------------------------------------- 56hrs. Total ------------------------------------------------ 64 hrs. 192 hrs. 4. Gymnasium ·(non-prepared) ---------------------------------- 12 hrs. SEQUENCE OF SUBJECTS IN THE FOUR-YEAR HOME ECONOMICS COURSE B. S. DEGREE First Quarter First Year English 4 H. E. 4 (Textiles) Science 91 Education 41 Second Year Elective Science 41 ·H. E. 5 or Elective H. E. 13 Third Year Science 44 H. E. 7 Elective Education 45 Fourth Year Social Studies 31 Elective Elective Education 54 Second Quarter Art 22 or 26 English 21 Elective H. E. 1 or Elective Elective Science 42 H. E. 6 Education 22 H. E. 17 H. E. 3 Science 95 Education 2 Social Studies 32 Elective Elective H. E. 11 Forty-one Third Quarter Elective H. E. 2 H. E. 14 Elective H. E. 16 Science 43 Science 93 Education 23 H. E. 18 H. E. 15 H. E. 8 Education 53 Social Studies 33 Elective Elective H. E. 12 ____ :..._:;;..,, . '". ./ ') Foods. Use of electricity for cooking purposes 1:t~.~-----~L-----------~~~~~~~~ li ~-------------------------------------------------------·---~~~~~ It '. t r 7 In the last year, Social Studies 41 and 42 may be used in combination \vith Social Studies 31, 32, and 33. Advise with the head of the department if making­the change. This course provides for 56 term-hours in electives, which should be carefully chosen. These electives .should be selected so as to constitute a second major, which will entitle the graduate to a second license as provided under the ruling of the State Teacher's Training Board. The elective courses should be chosen after consulting the head of the department in which the student wishes to have her second license. The department statements in the annual catalogue will help in the selection of courses. Students who have had 130 hours of Foods and Cookery in a recognized high scho'ol may omit Foods and Cookery 1 and may register for Foods and Cookery 2. ·Students who have 130 hours of Clothing in a recognized high school may omit Clothing 1 and may register for Clothing 2. Gymnasium should be carried throughout the course and is carried as a fifth subject, but the actual requirement is 12 term-hours. The state ruling provides for 8 term-ho.urs in English, but the department recommends a more extensive training in that field. Stud~nts who expect to supervise departments of Home Economics should elect Home Economics 9, Institutional Cookery, and Management. + Completion of this course"' gives a B. S. degree in Home Economics and prepares the graduate to teach in any Smith-Hughes Vocational School in the United States. REQUIREMENTS FOR SECOND GRADE SPECIAL HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER'S LICENSE IN HOME ECONOMICS THREE-YEAR COURSE The Special High-School Teacher's License, second grade, is valid for two years, renewable for two-year periods on presentation of evidence of one year of successful experience, professional spirit, and_ additional school preparation, and good for teaching or supervising Home Economics in a junior of senior high ·school or in an elementary schooJ. Details of requirements: · (a) Three years of the Four-year Home Economics course with a minimum of 144 term-hours. (b) Of these, 20 hours mmt be in professional work as outlined on page 39 of this bulletin. (c) Seventy-two hours must be in the field of Home Economics and its related subjects:-arts and sciences. (d) The remaining 72 hours are elective, preferably those in the first three years of work on the Special Four-year Course in Home E;conomics. REQUIREMENTS FOR FIRST AND SECOND GRADE R~GULAR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER'S LICENSE IN HOME ECONOMICS . Students who enroll on the Regular High-School Teacher's Curriculum, or who enroll on the General Supervisor's Course may elect Home Economics. as on of two major subjects: The requirements for license on these courses are 32 term-hours in the special field of Home Economics, plus 4 term-hours in special methods, making­a total of 36 hours. This is the minimum requirement for both first and second-grade licenses on the two curricula mentioned above. The requirements for the 36 hours are: Home Economics 2, Clothing 2 ------------------------- 4 hrs. Home Economics 3, Clothing 3 --------~--- ------------- 4 hrs. Home Economics 4, Textiles --·--------~-------~-------- 4 hrs. Home Economics 6, Foods and Cookery 2 --------------- 4 hrs. Home ·Economics 7, Foods and Cookery 3 --------------- 4 hrs. Home Economics 8, Dietetics -------------------------- 4 hrs. Forty-three m ~. ' Dietetics. Exhibit of balanced meals Foods. Laboratory where relative values of different fuels are demonstrated and studied Home Economics 11 or 15, Home Management 1 or House Planning and Decoration ------------------------- 4 hrs. Home Economics 17, Home Economics Methods ---------- 4 hrs. Home Economics 18, Organization of Home Economics ____ 4 hrs. Total ------------------------------------------------ 36 hrL EXTENSION AND CORRESPONDENCE COURSES IN HOME ECONOMICS The Extension and Correspondence Division of the Indiana State Normal School offers a number of courses in which credit may be earned out of residence. Read the general statement concerning residence r~qulr'ements as found in the annual catalogue. Write to the Extension and Correspondence Division of the Indiana St~te Normal School for the annual statement of courses that the school offers. Many credits earned out of residence must be from th~ general academic field because of the nature of the subject matter. From time to' time some laboratory sections may be organized in the special lines through extension classes, but these cannot be satisfactorily carried on by correspondence. DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS Ivah M. Rhyan, Professor Madelon Gallaher, Assistant Professor Louise Gillum, Assistant" Professor Geneva Nugent, Assistant Professor Florence Mirick, Assistant Professor SUBJECTS OFFERED DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR 1927-28 Those interested in courses offered during the Spring and Summer terms of 1927 should consult general catalogue for school year 1926-1927. Programs for these terms may be secured from the registrar. GENERAL ACADEMIC COURSES ·First Year 1. Clothing 1.-This course includes a study of sewing machines, the care, use and value of the various types. The artistic phase of clothing is demonstrated by .designs and decorative bands. Some straight line drafting is done and some simple garments are made. Commercial patterns are used and adjusted to suit the various types of figures. Care and repair of clothing receives attention. The clothing budget is discussed. Students who have 130 hours' work in a recognized high school may omit this course and register for Clothing 2. All courses. Fall and Spring Quarters. Miss Rhyan. · 2. Clothing. 2.-In this course more complicated pattern work is done. Students study the lines of the pattern in relation to the body structure. They develop patterns and gai·ments of the tailored type. Prerequisite, Clothing 1 or its equivalent. All courses. Fall, Winter and First Summer Quarters. Miss Rhyan. ·4. Textiles.-This course includes a study of the textile industries, a study of methods used in testing and distinguishing different fibers and fabrics and a discussion of different weaves. Processes of laundering, dyeing and dry cleaning are taught. Fabrics are ocnsidered as to composition and physical properties, with discussion of the principal factor affecting their value to the consumer. All courses. Fall; Winter, Spring, Mid-Spring and First Summer Quarters. Miss Gillum, Miss Gallaher. 14. Home Care of the Sick-This course places emphasis on building up the body to the highest degree of health as the principal function of the home nurse. The care of the sick in the home anrl rendering first aid in emergencies are discussed and demonstrated. This coune includes lectures, demonstrations and recitations. All courses. Fall, Winter, Spring, Mid-Spring and Second Summer Quarters. Miss Gillum, Miss Gallaher. Forty-five Foods. Practical work in food preparation House Planning and Decoration. Class studying window and wall treatment - L - Second Year 5. Foods and Cookery 1.--This course gives a working knowledge of typical household processes connected with food. All classes of foods are considered briefly from the standpoint of cultivation, distribution, preparation for the market composition and food value, care in the home and cookery. This course is open to girls who have had no food work in high school, and to boys who wis4 to learn the general principles of cookery. No chemistry is required. All courses. Students who have had 130 hours' work in a recognized high school may omit Cookery 1 and register for Cookery·2. Fall and Mid-Spring Quarters. Miss Gillum. 6. Foods and Cookery 2-The purpose of this course is to give a scientific as well as a .working knowledge of household processes connected with food. The cost of fuel, the use of the thermometer, of weights and measures are considered. Foods are studied as to their chemical composition, digestibility, dietetic value, place in the diet and combination in meals. Emphasis is placed on carbo-hydrates and proteins. No chemistry is required. Prerequisite, 5 Foods and Cookery 1, or equivalent. All courses. Fall and First Summer Quarters. Miss Gillum. 13. Costume Design-This course includes a history of costume and a study of the elements of design involved i.n costume. Students design dresses for different types of figures and make a study of ·each construction. They show the effect of color upon the individual and the harmony in color in the garment itself. They study possibilities of design in various fabrics, and in general try to show how principles of art may be applied to dress. Four-year cours2s. Fall, Winter and First Summer Quarters. Miss Gallaher. 16. Millinery.--The purpose of this course is to give students ability to design, model and make various types of hats and trimmings, but above all to give critical judgment of finished products. Four-year courses. Fall, and Spring Quarters. Miss Rhyan. Third Year 7. Food and Cookery 3.-The purpose of this course is to give a knowledge of the underlying principles of cookery that will enable a girl to construct working recipes, and to judge recipes already in print. Emphasis is placed upon doughs, batters, and breads. Girls are taught marketing in connection with serving, and much emphasis is placed upon economy in foods. Each girl serves as host, hostess, waitress, cook and guest; she also takes actve part in some formal social affairs. No chemistry is required. Prerequisite, 6 Foods and Cookery 2, or its equivalent. All courses. Winter, Spring and Second Summer Quarters. Miss Gillum. 17. Home Economics Methods-This course deals with t.he principles of teaching as' appled to home economics. All courses except rural. Winter, Spring and First Summer Guarters. Miss Ryan, Miss Gallaher. 18. Organization of Home Economics---'-The purpose o£ this course is to present teaching proble.ms of home economics- to study the organization-the work ·in various types of schools, and to emphasize the social and· economic values. All courses except rural. Winter and First Summer Quarters. Miss Rhyan. 8. Dietetics-This course deals with the varing requirments of the individual in health and disea~e from infancy to old age; in the light of chemistry and physiology of digestion, the energy value of foods; the nutritive properties of protien, fat, carbo-hydrates and ash constitutents. Typical dietaries are planned for the different periods, and the problems of satisfying the varying requirements of a family are considered with special attention to cost. Prerequisite, Cookery 3, Organic Chem­istry and Physiology 3. All courses. Spring and First Summer Quarters. Miss Gillum. 3. Clothing 3-This is a continuation of Clothing 2, emphasizing the artistic side of dreEs. All types of patterns are used and developed. Study of individual dress ·is emphasized. Most of the problems involved in this course are made from Forty-seven . ~-~--- • t_ ,. J House Planning and Decoration. Girls painting section of the house to make it harmonize with window draperies ,=~----~'"~'------~--~~~~==~~--~~----~--====~-~~~~~~- ! materials not suited to tailoring, such as silk, lace, chiffons, crepes and thin wash fabrics. One woolen garment is made. Prerequisite, Clothing 2. All courses. Fall, Spring and Second Summer Quarters. Miss Rhyan. 15. House Planning and Furnishing-This course includes a study of factors controlling modern house planning .and furnishing. Topics con-sidered are family needs, influence of home management upon plans, industrial conditions influencing the house, and making floor plans and elevations. Furnishing the house is considered from artistic, economic and scientific points of view. Four-year courses. Fall, Spring and Seco_nd Summer Quarters. Miss Gallaher. Fourth Year 11. Home Management !-(Administration) This course deals with the applica­tion of scientific and economic principles to the problems of the modern housewife. It takes up economy of time, labor and finance, household efficiency, household service and home life. All courses. Fall and Spring Quarters. Miss Gallaher. 12. Home Management 2-(Supervised.) This course brings all lines of study together by permitting the stu_!;!ent to actually manage a house for a given time, making it a business proposition. It is the course in which all the theories of home­making are tried out in practical living. Preresuisite, nine credits in H. E., includ­ing Food Courses and Home Management 1. Four-year courses. Winter and Sum­mer Quarters. Miss Gallaher. 9. Institutional Cookery and Management-This course deals with problems of lunch rooms for institutions ond for schools. Attention is given to equipment, management, meal service, and economic problems. The school cafeteria is used as the laboratory for this work. Prerequisite, 7 Foods and Cookery 3. Four-year courses. Winter and Summer Quarters. Miss Mirick. Rural School 19. Course for Rt~ral Teachers.:..-This is a ~ourse dealing with the general pro­terns of home economics. The purpose is to help the rural teacher organize materials and to assist her in presenting it to the children where equipment is limited. Rural School Course. Winter Quarter. Miss Rhyan. Forty-nine
AuthorIndiana State Normal School
RepositoryIndiana State University Archives, Cunningham Memorial Library, 6 1/2 Street, Terre Haute, Indiana, 47809, http://library.indstate.edu/archives.
Date Digital2012-12-19
Date Original1927
CoverageUnited States -- Indiana -- Vigo County -- Terre Haute -- 1927
SubjectIndiana State Normal School
Indiana State University
College buildings
Students
Teachers
WV3 SubjectEducation
Business & Industry
Domestic Life
Typetext
still image
image
Material TypeBooks
Technical Metadataapplication/pdf; 24-bit color; 8-bit grayscale; 1-bit bitonal; 300 dpi; Canon EOS 5D; Adobe Acrobat 10.1.4;
RightsDigital image copyright 2012 Indiana State University Archives, 6 1/2 Street, Terre Haute, Indiana 47809.
Identifieruar2.1 Provost and VP for Academic Affairs / Catalogs series
Item IDisua-catalog-1927-industrial_arts_home_economics
add to favorites : reference url back to results : previous : next
powered by CONTENTdm ® | contact us  ^ to top ^